Using Famous or Celebrity Voices

I don't believe it!

The client phones me and tells me he has had an idea. It’s using an impression of Richard Wilson with the final line “I don’t believe it” I don’t believe it, it’s the third time that month I have to explain that the radio station and the client could be sued. Richard Wilson is available to do Voice Overs and makes a portion of his living from that kind of work. An impression of him is a form of theft. You could use the genuine article, but he may not do the catch-phrase and is probably sick to death of people asking him! AND how long ago was that show on mainstream TV?

Talk to your writer. A well known personality could add so much to your campaign.

Some Celebrities make themselves readily available for radio work, have great agents and are a delight to work with, but there others who you wont get past their agent because they “don’t do radio”. Some people wont do certain products or services either for personal reasons or because they are already tied to a regional or national advertiser in the same category, or their tied into a contract, like soap stars usually can’t do commercials or people doing Motoring Programmes may not be able to do car ads. Just try booking Jeremy Clarkson for a Motor Dealer ad!

Some are just too busy to do radio… and don’t need the money.
Some just can’t do it. Voicing is a skill and not everyone can do it… even some well known actors just can’t perform in front of the radio microphone.

Your writer can advise you, find agents, organise sessions, book studios in the capital, where most celebs want to work, or find studios around the country. You will pay a premium for Celebrity Voices, but it can be a lot less than you think. Think about producing multiple ads at the same time because the more ads you have done at once the more cost effective it can become. Your writer will be able to give you a quote.

When you are presented with ads for a celebrity voice there are certain things which should have been taken into consideration:-

They will be written for that specific person. Don’t expect that the scripts written for Tom Baker can be voiced by Joe Pasquali.

You WILL have to pay a fortune if you want any kind of endorsement. So don’t expect John Doe to say “Hi, this is John Doe and I love Billy Burn’s BMW Garage” You will be expected to pay thousands if the VO even agrees to do it. Most of the time you are employing the actor to play a part.

The voice must be recognisable. You might not be able to name the person but their voice will be familiar.

Make sure the voice would convey your sales message effectively. Ask the writer why he chose the voice, they should have specific reasons.

And book the celebrity… not the part they play on a TV show or in a movie. That part doen’t even belong to them…. so book Richard Wilson… but don’t expect him to be the “One Foot in the Grave” character.

And one more danger! Make sure that your product or service is remembered FIRST… NOT the celebrity voice, with the listener not remembering what the ad was about. The Celebrity voice sould be there to make you think MORE about the product or service.

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Let Your Staff Know

One day God was sitting when an Angel came up to him. “God, you’ve created all these wonderful things, but the guys down stairs would like to have a go… we’ve formed a committee… and we think we can do a pretty good job.” For the next week God could hear all the arguments and discussions coming from the board room… until he was finally presented with the results… “What is heaven’s name is THAT!?” He asked. “That…. Is a platypus!”

…………………………………………………………………….

The shop assistant looked back at me blankly over the counter. He was doing his best impression of a goldfish. I was there because of the special offer on a mobile phone. Free in car charger, hands free kit and leather case. The problem was that the owner of the shop had not communicated any of their current campaign with anyone on the shop floor. The manager said it had been discussed, but no decision had been made. The owner had actually started running radio ads on the local station, but the shop did not even have the radio station playing in the store! No communication and a lot of red faces.

If you’re doing any radio advertising campaign… no ANY advertising campaign… it is essential that all your staff are briefed and know how to respond to a customer. It’s a good idea to play the radio commercials to your staff. But this is the moment to warn them, you are not looking for opinions. You’re not interested if your staff likes them or doesn’t like them. In all likely hood your staff are not the target audience for your product. You are letting them know what is going out on air. If you allow your staff to make changes, give opinions, make their opinions on the script you will end up with a platypus script. I have even had one client who would get the opinion of his 7 year old child before he ran a commercial… he was selling window frames, not even a product aimed at children. Not the actions of a smart marketeer.

Your emplotees opinions may count, you need the experience of your people at the sharp end, but at a much earlier stage of the creative, and in the overall creative collective brain of your business.

Remember, you staff need to know what’s happening with your advertising.

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Retail Sales Staff